Grout in the Kitchen

Grout in the Kitchen
by Sam Weyland

Do you have a clean kitchen? Well, you should. Your kitchen, the counter in particular, will have constant contact with the food that you cook, which in turn will make contact with your body. It’s not farfetched to assume that whatever is growing on your kitchen counter will get to your food, and consequentially into your stomach.

That means that, even if you do not like it, you will have to clean your kitchen. I suppose you clean it on a regular basis anyway, so is that enough? Well, no. Do not forget the oftentimes unnoticed part of your kitchen counter: The grout.

Because of the composition of the grout itself, the material tends to absorb everything around it, most notably spoiled food bits, dust, and slime. So as the absorbed particles get gathered up, the muck it absorbed earlier gets pulled deeper in deeper. The grout as a whole, then, becomes harder to clean. Basically, the longer you don’t clean it, the harder it becomes to clean when you actually decide to.

And then, as if the bacteria aren’t enough, leave it unkempt for a while and it begins to breed the dreaded fungus known as the black mold. This greenish-black mold is very irritating to both our pets and us; mere contact with it causes skin rash, and at its worst, it has been known to make an infant’s lungs bleed.

Therefore, clean your kitchen grout. Clean it everyday by washing and scrubbing with a suitable cleanser. Coat it with an alcohol-water solution as well; spraying the contents onto the surface.

Now, if you find it difficult to clean your grout, then you probably have not cleaned it in a very long time. but don’t fret, for you can still hire professional grout cleaners. There’s one in Atlanta that I personally recommend, and they are very competent with their job. Call them now, and watch your kitchen grout go clean once more.

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