Check out: Shop Fox W1758 Wood Lathe With Cast Iron Legs And Digital Readout

Shop Fox W1758 Wood Lathe With Cast Iron Legs And Digital Readout

Shop Fox W1758 Wood Lathe With Cast Iron Legs And Digital Readout
FOX® 16″ X 46″ with Stand and DRO
Here it is! Our fully featured and powerful wood lathe at a competitive price! Featuring a hefty 2 HP motor, ten speeds, a swivel-head for outboard turning, a for exact spindle speed, precision ground bed, headstock and tailstock quick locks, and heavy cast iron for stability, this beauty will handle it all! tachometer
Swivel Head

Includes: 6″ faceplate, MT#2 spur center, MT#2 live center, tool rest w/ swivel arm base
Motor: 2 HP, 110V, single-phase
Swing over bed: 16″
Distance between centers: 46″
Heavy-duty, precision ground cast iron bed and cast iron legs ensure stability and minimal vibration
1″ x 8 TPI RH headstock spindle
Spindle tachometer with digital
MT#2 spindle & tailstock tapers
Spindle bore: 3/8″
Standard tool rest extension
10 speeds: 600 – 2400 RPM
Quick lock/release levers for tailstock & headstock
0°, 60°, 90°, 120° and 180° headstock rotat

  • Motor: 2 HP, 110V, single-phase
  • Heavy-duty, precision ground cast iron bed and cast iron legs ensure stability and minimal vibration
  • Lever speed adjustment, 10 speeds: 600 – 2400 RPM
  • Quick lock/release levers for tailstock and headstock; 0 Degree, 60 Degree, 90 Degree, 120 Degree and 180 Degree headstock rotation
  • Includes: 6-Inch faceplate, MT#2 spur center, MT#2 live center and tool rest w/ swivel arm base

List Price: $ 599.00

Price: [wpramaprice asin=”B0019CGYLM”]

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Question by maddog4696: Why is it not a good idea to rip on a radial arm saw?
This has been a question on my mind for a while now, I have heard from everybody I know that work in wood shops to not rip on a radial arm saw because it is not a good idea, even though you can it would be safer to rip on a table saw. Because its gets annoying ripping on a table saw, having to set up the rip fence every time. Anyone have a idea why it is not a good idea to rip on radial arm saw?

Best answer:

Answer by hoosierman
Well… the wood wants to buck away from the saw blade and you have no real control over the saw since the blade is above the piece you are cutting. Also, a friend of mine cut his thumb wide open on a table saw once when he tried to push the wood through the fence area. If you slip and fall into a radial saw blade you will be cut to shreds. It is just way too dangerous to rip on a radial arm saw. I just put up with the multiple fence adjustments and use push sticks on MY table saw and I still have all my fingers!

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Comments

    • Rick
    • January 29, 2014
    58 of 58 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Mid Range Lathe is OK, May 8, 2009
    By 
    Rick

    This review is from: Shop Fox W1758 Wood Lathe With Cast Iron Legs And Digital Readout (Tools & Home Improvement)
    I love the variable speed, but the low speed is too fast – and getting faster. It started at around 600 rpm, but now does not get below 1000. Ordered a new belt to get the speed down (as the belt wears and gets narrower, the speed goes up. The motor seems to have the power it needs, so stalling is minimal.

    I don’t have a big band saw, so my bowl planks are very out of round and chunky from the chain saw when I start, but I only had one (so far) that caused the lathe to walk across the floor. Probably would help to add some weight…

    The main issue I have found so far is the the levers that hold the tool rest strip out very easily – especially if you use the articulated arm. Shop Fox has sent me 4 sets of replacement, and I just stopped using the arm so I could keep turning. The banjo foot is a little short, and is hard to work around the larger bowls without the arm. (but possible)

    Customer Service has been great – sending replacement parts when I need them. They even sent a replacement belt at no charge.

    The tail stock does not tighten into the correct position always, I have to put a twist on it when I secure it or it will line up a little to the left. With the twist it is spot on.

    It has no reverse, no hand wheel, and no way to lock the spindle in the headstock.

    All in all, it gets the job done, but does not have the polish and the craftsmanship of the bigger lathes. I have been able to turn 14″ bowls, candle holders, lidded boxes, and most anything I have tried. Sometimes the pucker factor is high due to the speed, but I have managed.

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    • Matthew Raml
    • January 29, 2014
    20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Decent, December 13, 2010
    By 
    Matthew Raml (Thornton, CO) –

    This review is from: Shop Fox W1758 Wood Lathe With Cast Iron Legs And Digital Readout (Tools & Home Improvement)
    If you are just considering costs and what this lathe can do I would consider it a five star item, but this is by no means a quality piece of machinery. As the other reviewer stated as the belt wears the speed increases. Once the belt broke during my replacement of the new belt the aluminum adjustable gear that was suppose to hold the belt on just broke. The tool rest itself is also quite cheap and the adjustment bolts that came with it stripped out in less than 3 weeks. I would purchase this lathe again but be aware that you will have to replace some of the cheaper pieces with more expensive higher quality parts down the line.

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    • Bill
    • January 29, 2014

    The chances of the wood being cut can catch and get jammed between the carriage and the deck caused by binding. In order to complete the cut you have to stick you hands and ar into a dangerous position On a 12″ radial saw all 12″s of the blade is exposed. There is a good chance the wood being cut will become a projectile and fly back causing death or very serious injury. On a table saw the wood can get bound up but not jammed as there is nothing but space above. When using a table or radial it is best to stand to one side a little incase the wood catches and shoots back. You seem to know the rest of the dangers. Listen to the guys who use the tool every day as they know what should and shouldn’t be done

    • Jim J
    • January 29, 2014

    There is nothing wrong with ripping on a RAS and I have done so quite often. The dangerous part is to keep you hands away from the blade when getting near the end. Your RAS should have a guard. Do not use one that does not. Adjust the guard until it is just higher than the stock so that the stock feeds easily but that you cannot get your hands underneath. Then use a push stick to finish the cut. The RAS is used mostly for cross cutting but there is no reason not to rip as well. The RAS has more blade available for cutting fingers than a table saw has for this operation so safety and attention to detail are imperative.

    • Corky R
    • January 29, 2014

    Far as I know, the only reason to readjust the rip fence on a table saw is in the instance of wanting to cut a different size width. Seems like there would need to be an adjustment made on a radial arm saw in order to cut a different width also, so where’s the time savings? Besides, you need a lot longer space in order to rip long boards on a radial arm saw, (which ususally is mounted permanently on a wall bench), than you do on a table saw, which is frequently portable, mine’s on rollers.

    • pcbeachrat
    • January 29, 2014

    I prefer to rip on A radial arm saw..I have the old Craftsman radial arm saw..and a old craftsman table saw too..My preference is the radial arm saw… The craftsman products made the last 20 years suck..and they have really gone downhill.. That is why you have the finger guards etc to prevent from kickbacks…I think maybe the new wave carpenters..Don’t suggest it..because they don’t know how properly… I PREFER MINE>> it kiks arz!

    • ben s
    • January 29, 2014

    I dont have a problem ripping with my RAS,but if your working with a long piece of wood the blade tends to push it up whereas with a table saw it pushes it down onto the table. When the wood gets pushed up it tends to want to buck a little, but if your using the proper blade it shouldn’t be too much of a problem. If you have a choice use the table saw

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