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Pelargonium

We have a vast range of plants suitable for indoor and garden room decoration and for the garden display in summer. Almost all are easy to grow if they have a light position and one is not too heavy-handed with the watering-can.

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Monopodial Orchids

Colouration can be found on orchids, in particular among the tall-growing, two-leaved Cattleya species known as the bifoliate cattleyas. Purple shows up clearly on new growth, but is gradually lost. It may appear on the leaf’s upper surface and on the new sheaths protecting the growing pseudobulb. Odontoglossum grande covers the undersides of its leaves with delicate brown flecking, and many other examples may be found.

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Hygrophorus Mushrooms

The Fairy-ring ,champignon has been well known to country dwellers for a long time. Apart from the Boletus and the Chanterelle (Cantharellus cibarius) this used to be the only mushroom picked for eating. Its distinguishing characteristics are a pleasant smell of burnt almonds, an elastic yet firm stipe and its permanently white, sparse and deeply cut gills. It grows in circles in strips of dark green grass on the margins of forests, in pastures on downs and lawns, and alongside meadow paths. It is a tasty, popular mushroom, particularly good for preparing soups.

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Polypore

This Polypore is one of the most damaging but also prevalent members of this extensive family and lives on old trunks of fruit trees. Its fruit-bodies are juicy, meaty, heavY and very watery.

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Davallia Cana Riensis (Hare’s-foot Fern)

There are two kinds suitable as house or garden room plants: Cyperus dUjiisus, the smaller of the two, is more suited to the living room, while the tall and stately C. alternifolius will do better in more spacious surroundings. Both must have a lightly shaded position in which to grow and must be kept very moist at all times. In fact, these are two of the few indoor plants that will benefit if their plant pots are left standing in water. It can be a shallow dish of an ornamental pool.

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Echeveria

Epiphyllums require very similar conditions to those described above for echevcrias and, like them, they may be placed out of doors in a sheltered, sunny position during the warmer months of the year.

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Tips on Growing Ivy as Houseplant

In spite of the vast number of plants which are much more attractive in appearance a surprising number of green-leaved ivies still retain their popularity. The fact that there are so many other colourful plants on the market is in all probability a very good reason for the continued appeal of the green varieties, as they are useful for toning down the colouring when planted arrangements are being prepared. H. Chicago has simple-shaped green leaves with no frills whatsoever. Green Ripple has slightly larger green leaves with prominent veins which are the main attraction.

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Capsicum baccatum L. Chillies

Capsicum baccatum L. species is South American in origin, where the wild and cultivated varieties are found. It is distinguished from the other species or Capsicum by the yellow or tan markings in the throat of the corolla and the yellow anthers. It is difficult to distinguish from C. annuum in the fruiting stage, as it has many of the same fruit forms.

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Dipelta

The variety I grow as aurea-variegata has, like so many favourites, suffered a name change and must now be known as maculata.

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The oleoresins

This is the most important of the three products. While accounts of its commercial production are understandably scarce. According to Mathew et al. (1971), who studied the preparation of the production of oleoresin from African, Indian, and Japanese chillies, the chillies are usually supplied with stalks attached, and these have to be removed, to facilitate grinding and to avoid the undesirable green colour of chlorophyll in the final product.

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