Discount: CARE AND REPAIR OF SHOP MACHINES BY JOHN WHITE

CARE AND REPAIR OF SHOP MACHINES BY JOHN WHITE

CARE AND REPAIR OF SHOP MACHINES BY JOHN WHITE
Veteran woodworker John White shows you how to assemble, tune, maintain & repair the machines that you count on. Throughout the book, White’s approach is practical, straight-forward & effective. This is the first book you’ll reach for when your machines are not performing, and it’s the book you need to keep them running at their best.

  • A complete guide to setup, troubleshooting & maintenance.
  • Low-tech solutions & alternatives to expensive set up tools & jigs.
  • Clear, concise troubleshooting information geared to help solve common tool problems.
  • Excellent jigs to improve tool performance.
  • A must for keeping your machines running at their peak.

List Price: $ 16.99

Price: $ 15.99

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$269.99
End Date: Saturday Nov-24-2018 22:34:53 PST
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Wood Work Shop Dust Collector 1.5HP Filter Bag Garage Air Cleaner Efficient
$269.99
End Date: Saturday Nov-24-2018 22:35:00 PST
Buy It Now for only: $269.99
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http://AskWoodman.com/ This is the second video in a short series about using laminate to make shop work surfaces. Allan explains how laminate is made, demon…

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Comments

    • Thomas Goffe "tomstermcmonster"
    • August 23, 2013
    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    This is an essential reference for any workshop., September 14, 2006
    By 
    Thomas Goffe “tomstermcmonster” (Smithfield, NC) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: CARE AND REPAIR OF SHOP MACHINES BY JOHN WHITE (Misc.)

    John’s wide ranging experience with shop machinery and knowledge of their idiosyncracies are brought to bear in a lucid and comprehensive reference manual that belongs in every workshop. I highly recommend this book and can say that the money spent buying it and in following his advice will be repaid many times over.

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    • Anonymous
    • August 23, 2013
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Care and Repair of Shop Machines, November 29, 2010
    By 
    David K. Wagner “Ken Wagner” (Los Angeles) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: CARE AND REPAIR OF SHOP MACHINES BY JOHN WHITE (Misc.)

    This book is an excellent source of information on the adjustment and maintenance of machines commonly used in the woodshop, including the table saw, router table, jointer, thickness planer, bandsaw, drill press, and miter saw. I bought it to learn more about adjusting these tools for optimal performance and accuracy. I was particularly interested in how to adjust the blade on the table saw so that it is accurately parallel to the miter-gauge slot. The book was very helpful. I would recommend it to anyone interested in getting the most performance from their woodworking machine tools.

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    • askwoodman
    • August 23, 2013

    Glad it helped. That little guy is Papi. He likes to stand on my boot top for attention. It almost always works. Thanks for watching. Allan

    • M Gleason
    • August 23, 2013

    Looks like you have a little helper! Thanks for the info, if it wasn’t for videos like this I would get nothing done.

    • askwoodman
    • August 23, 2013

    Thanks for watching. Papi and I thank you.

    • lampoon154
    • August 23, 2013

    Great video. I learned a lot.  BTW, loved that little dog. Thanks for sharing!

    • askwoodman
    • August 23, 2013

    I should have been more clear. The liquid contact cement gets into porous material and does bond. I should have said the semi dry contact only sticks to itself and then bonds. Good technical catch. Thanks.

    • William Krause
    • August 23, 2013

    If contact cement only bonds to contact cement, how does it hold things that are not made out of contact cement together?

    • askwoodman
    • August 23, 2013

    I just use a synthetic nap roller. But you may want to consider a spray contact adhesive for the thin material you are using. 3M has whole line of products for this type of work. You may consider their Super 77 to start with. 

    • figadodeporco
    • August 23, 2013

    Hi! I’m trying to apply contact cement to laminate some mdf in p.e.t recycled plastic. But as it is thinner than formica, every little bump of cement appears after lamination. I tryed to spread the glue with a spatula, but it’s worse…. what kind of roller do you use? I had some difficulty to listen (i’m not an english speaker), so is it a wooven roller, a wool roller (….)?!?!?

    • askwoodman
    • August 23, 2013

    Wayne did you get my response through Facebook? Just let me know if I can help with more info. Allan

    • Wayne Rose
    • August 23, 2013

    I need to make a small (roughly 24″ x 30″) laminated tabletop. Both sides need to be laminated. I’m mounting the laminate to ¾” MDF. Three of the corners need to have a 3″ radius cut. The one remaining corner needs to have about 11″ cut off at a 30° angle with rounded corners cut as well.

    Do you suggest that I cut the corners first, laminate it and then use a trim bit on the laminate, one side at a time, or should I laminate the table first, then cut all of the corners?

    • chinooking1
    • August 23, 2013

    what a dweeb

    • askwoodman
    • August 23, 2013

    In my Ultimate Work Table Series there are more videos about putting down a large sheet of laminate. Thanks for watching and commenting.

    • avantisprod
    • August 23, 2013

    I like this video very much. It never occured to me that I could cut a roller. I am quite interested in learning how to work with laminate right now. Thanks, I enjoyed this!

    • deeplake33
    • August 23, 2013

    Fair enough, the guy made a mistake with the excessive glue & cutting on a surface he just cleaned. But He’s probably good at what he does. Just needs more practice with working on camera, that’s all.
    Even the best tradesman can stuff up on occasions.

    Just a tip when choosing a roller, use a thin fine bristled one, it doesn’t absorb as much glue & spreads better.

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