Review: 2 1/2″ TO 2 1/4″ REDUCER FOR DUST COLLECTION By Peachtree Woodworking – PW449

2 1/2″ TO 2 1/4″ REDUCER FOR DUST COLLECTION By Peachtree Woodworking – PW449

2 1/2
The 1/43; to 1/443; reduces in a smaller increment that normal, it only steps down a 1/443; of an inch. The reason for this is, specific machinery setups like Shop-Vac can use this fitting as a plug for the hose assembly.

  • Reduces in a smaller increment than normal reducers.
  • Steps down by only a 1/4″.
  • Machinery setups like Shop-Vac can use this fitting as a plug adaptor
  • Sturdy ABS plastic construction

List Price: $ 7.25

Price: [wpramaprice asin=”B001JB8LAK”]

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http://AskWoodman.com/ This is the third video in a short series about using laminate to make shop work surfaces. Allan explains how laminate is made, demons…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Comments

    • Anonymous
    • August 29, 2013
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Straightforward purchase, May 30, 2013
    By 
    HvR “Music Junky” (Kansas City, KS USA) –

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: 2 1/2″ TO 2 1/4″ REDUCER FOR DUST COLLECTION By Peachtree Woodworking – PW449 (Misc.)

    Pardon the pun on the title of the comment, but this is really a no brainer purchase for those of us looking at this. This is made with standard plastic connecting material that does exactly what it is supposed to. Plastic is high quality and not brittle.

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    • Anonymous
    • August 29, 2013
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Fits perfect, May 1, 2013
    By 
    Greg M (Seattle) –

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: 2 1/2″ TO 2 1/4″ REDUCER FOR DUST COLLECTION By Peachtree Woodworking – PW449 (Misc.)

    Used this to adapted my Dayton Shop Vac to the 2-1/2″ standard. Just put it where the hose connected before. Perfect!

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    • Anonymous
    • August 29, 2013
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Vacuum system, April 28, 2013
    By 
    Robert

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: 2 1/2″ TO 2 1/4″ REDUCER FOR DUST COLLECTION By Peachtree Woodworking – PW449 (Misc.)

    with this little gadget I was able to incoorporate some of my parts from my old system with little to know cost…

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    • TheBearwithchainsaws
    • August 29, 2013

    Just out of interest here…what shop would this be?

    • askwoodman
    • August 29, 2013

    Thanks for your comments, but I do not allow profanity on my channel. I will give you an opportunity to amend your posts, but if you don’t I will remove it. Thanks. Allan

    • HENJAM48
    • August 29, 2013

    very useful… your a good teacher for non-metric-using, wrong-side-of-the-road-driving woodworker. Thanks! 😉

    • Will McKnight
    • August 29, 2013

    If you do misalign, lacquer thinner in a squirt bottle will save you a huge headache, a little messy but so much faster. Let it dry, sand any lumpy glue and reapply.

    • askwoodman
    • August 29, 2013

    I am still waiting on Larry’s demo.

    • askwoodman
    • August 29, 2013

    That is a good point about the junk that come off of sticks. I try to only use really well milled pieces of maple, mahogany or other good hardwood. But since I primarily do woodwork these sticks fortunately are always around in my shop. The Kraft paper idea sounds interesting too.

    • isneezeintwos
    • August 29, 2013

    I strongly disagree with Larry1942Will. Trying to do it free hand is very risky unless you have a large piece of laminate and a small wooden panel to glue to.

    Trying to separate a misaligned piece of laminate takes tons of labor and time! A little time spent preparing is absolutely necessary in laminate work. It pays off big time and saves you from wasting effort and money from trying to remove a misaligned piece.

    Be clean, orderly and careful with this process because it does not forgive.

    • isneezeintwos
    • August 29, 2013

    I use two sheets of Kraft paper instead of sticks. It lays flat between each surface to be glued. Once you have lined up the laminate piece, with a little pressure on it slowly pull out one side of the kraft paper. Press this down so it sticks, then do the same on the other side. It is easier to line up the laminate piece because you really only have one chance to do it right. I have had problems with wooden sticks or dowel rods because they occasionally drop dust or debri on the glue.

    • deleetmeeh
    • August 29, 2013

    I concur. Gotta love the constructive attitude. From my experience all the cabinet guys I’ve worked with use dowels or sticks for laminate. Larry sounds like a get it done guy where as Allan is a get it done with quality guy.

    • askwoodman
    • August 29, 2013

    Five extra minutes once or twice a year? My method ensures no chance for a positioning mistake for someone who only occasionally does laminate just for shop fixtures. I will continue to use the sticks. I see you have no content. Why don’t you make a video showing your expertise for us all to learn from?

    • Larry Will
    • August 29, 2013

    Why? It’s slower, time is $!

    • manholewisdom
    • August 29, 2013

    hey pleaase make a video of that , sounds like a good trick.

    • askwoodman
    • August 29, 2013

    I will “stick” to my method.

    • Larry Will
    • August 29, 2013

    It’s pointless to use the sticks on laying laminate. A waste of time. Guys here lay 4×8 sheets free hand. Position one corner with the laminate curled back with the other hand guide the sheet down a long the edge as you go. You’d get trained or fired if you used sticks in my shop!

    • Steven Nicholls
    • August 29, 2013

    no problem at all mate, happy to help!

    • askwoodman
    • August 29, 2013

    Excellent tips. People who read this thread will surely find the information you shared very useful. Thank you for sharing your knowledge and taking the time post here. Allan

    • Steven Nicholls
    • August 29, 2013

    yes it should do, we use a spray on contact adhesive at work from tuskbond, not sure what type of glue your using but you can always give it a try. another tip aswell if your doing edges then a top, once you’ve trimmed the edge laminate flush dont sand the sharp edge off it, glue the top on and the joint will be seemless. then just take the edge off your top!

    • askwoodman
    • August 29, 2013

    Will the hot iron method work on glue that that has long since cured?

    • askwoodman
    • August 29, 2013

    Thanks for answering this. My skill level with laminate if pretty much just based on flat work surfaces. Thanks for helping. Allan

    • Steven Nicholls
    • August 30, 2013

    i assume you want to laminate the edges of the top then the top itself? you would have to do that in seperate applications. say your top is 18mm thick cut strips of laminate about 22mm thick and glue them to an edge of your top. trim it off flush then glue the top on. take care where your edges are going to be though. for example you wouldnt want to glue the top on then the edges beacuse if you looked directly at the top you would see the edges.

    • Steven Nicholls
    • August 30, 2013

    a tip instead of using spirits to remove the laminate get a hot iron on the laminate which should melt the glue under it and carefully pull the laminate back up, obviously dont pull too hard as the laminate could snap but it is a quicker and cheaper way to remove glued laminate

    • Huang Danny
    • August 30, 2013

    Thanks for the informative video.. now I have a quick question, how is it done to cover the entire perimeter on the outer rim of the top? Do you simply cut a bigger piece and make a 90 degree bent and apply cement around the rim of the bench top? How would you then be able to trim the excess off??

    • askwoodman
    • August 30, 2013

    Glad you found some useful info here. I am by no means a laminate expert, but I just wanted to show a technique that has worked for me for make shop fixtures. Thanks for watching and taking your time to comment.

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